Getting high quality and useful images for your church website

Getting quality images, is one of the most effect communication tools out there. It says “1000 words” quicker than any other medium. And can set a tone for the quality of your organization.

Overall we are looking for the highest quality you can afford, and we don’t mean money specifically, but the what you can afford with this short turnaround including schedules, weather and another handful of variables it takes to manage to create quality images. If it were easy, as they say, we’d have it done by now.

For our purposes, we need images for the website and social media. You might need additional images, for other communication vehicles, like brochures, posters, etc, but to streamline the process we are going to direct you to images for screen-based viewing.

We have some basic photography tips on our website: http://mightymegaphone.com/photography-tips/

But, we’d like to give you a few more detailed specs:

• Please shoot your images horizontal.

• Leave room in the upper 1/2 of the image for text.

• Shoot wider than you would for portrait photography. We can always crop in, but it is harder to add parts of the image back in.

• Shoot with a shallow depth of field when applicable.

• Keep diversity in mind. Illustrate inclusiveness when you can.

• Capturing textures is helpful.

• Shoot in RAW or the biggest file size you can.

• We really only need 8-10 final images.

* Exterior of your church building.

• Church life. The major focal points of campus, like the altar, baptismal fount, sanctuary.

• Within your community. When your are gathered, get smiling / kind faces. Candid is best. We don’t need a “group shot”. Interaction and activity.

• Candles, Communion elements, and other worship images.

• If meals or service projects are major staples to your ministry, please capture it.

• You can edit down your photos to 15 or so and send the RAW files to us and we can do the final editing and provide retouching.

• For a website slider, or topper, we have a very obscure aspect ratio. It needs to be very wide but not very tall.

Here is a before and after: